comparison 9

20 02 2016

comparison A blog

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bambi GG813

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bambi recreated.rain-111

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© disney enterprises, inc





comparison 8

18 02 2016

comparison A blog

rough small sketches in black/white like the following were done to define the value range, the light and shadow, as well as the staging of the animation in the scene. this is from the disney animated feature BAMBI in 1940. later that step was part of the WORKBOOK, the translation of the storyboard into ‘film-language’, where every single scene is prepared in staging, size and camera movements, as well as rough indication of light/shadow and a floorplan, to go from there into layout and later into the background department. during BAMBI that process was more simplified, because every major sequence had an own art director, who was the one defining these staging sketches, as well as the color script for that sequence. they supervised every single step during production, in a way they were ‘directing’ the visuals behind the animation. you can see little differences in handling the staging in this film. for example the climax of the film, the shooting of bambi and the fire was art-directed by john hubley, a master in cinematography. you get an idea when you look at his personal work later in new york.

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here you can compare the initial rough planning of that scene and the final result…

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bambi sc.40 DD0069

look at the little blue thumbnail on top, it is the rough for the next shot, the reverse camera angle…

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bambi 0069 rev.39

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basics

21 01 2016

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5thumper anim.1

floorplan, scene planning, color script, storyboard
from THE ART OF WALT DISNEY, ROBERT D.FEILD, 1942

© disney enterprises, inc





masterpieces

10 05 2013

so far I guess I have recreated more than one hundred backgrounds from disney’s BAMBI. you probably know that only a few originals from the film are left because most of the scenes where shot in levels with the MULTIPLANE-camera, had to be painted in oil on glass, and after the shots were successful some poor guy had to scrape off the master-paintings from the glass. glass was rare during WWII and had to be reused. the recreated BG’s below were seen the last time in original around 1941/42. the first one is about one third of the full length of the opening pan of the film, shot in 8 levels to create the feel of depth.

bambi comp 3 A
BAmbi 9027
BAmbi 22054
bambi CCC62
BAmbi 11164
bambi A008a

© disney enterprises, inc





shades of green

17 06 2012

after a long time some more recreated backgrounds from disney’s masterpiece BAMBI. all of them were painted in oil, most of them on glass for the use in the multiplane camera.






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comparison 6

26 08 2010

whenever I look at the layouts and backgrounds from disney’s BAMBI I am not sure what I admire more – the graphite ‘painted’ black/white layouts on vellum paper or the final oil-painted BG’s on glass or cardboard.


LISA KEENE, who is a BG-artist and art director in the DISNEY-feature animation studio in burbank, send me a very interesting note about the BAMBI BG-painting technique, and I want to share it with everybody. she writes –

I just thought I would tell you what I know about these BAMBI BG’s, I thought you may be interested. the first time I saw the glass plates, I think it was around 1983 and they were housed in a corrugated steal building where the ABC-building is now in the far west corner where the grass is. a dark drafty building where the low level light showed the dust partials in the air. it really left an impression on me because BAMBI is my all time favorite Disney film and I was shocked that they were treated so casually. I was surprised they weren’t all broken. I can’t remember what else was in the building but there was lots of other stuff.
many of the BGs that were not multiplanes were of varying mediums. of course the paint on the glass was oil but many were painted with watercolor or thinly with oil. it seemed that what ever the artist was more comfortable using it was just fine. we had to use these BG’s to copy from and learn the technique so I was surprised that they weren’t all the same.
I suspect that often the glass plates were covered with a neutral color, grey, so that when the glass moved over another plate nothing showed through a thinly painted level. we still did that when we painted on cel and oddly enough still do when we are on the computer. also if the paint is thin on the sides of an area whenever that overlay level passed over the one below and the below level was dark the edges on the one above would appear to ghost when the camera lights would hit it, so it needed to be backed carefully. you see some of that especially in the opening shot.
transferring the layout with a metal stylus was used with graphite paper turned downward and the layout used on top using the stylus so not to ruin the layout. If no graphite paper could be had we often made our own.
Anyway I’m sure you know all of this but I though if you hadn’t seen the old building where the glass plates were you might enjoy the story.

thank you so much for that insight, LISA.

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comparison 5

14 08 2010

some more layouts and the recreated corresponding backgrounds from disney’s BAMBI and 101 DALMATIANS.







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