comparison 9

20 02 2016

comparison A blog

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bambi GG813

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bambi recreated.rain-111

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© disney enterprises, inc





comparison 8

18 02 2016

comparison A blog

rough small sketches in black/white like the following were done to define the value range, the light and shadow, as well as the staging of the animation in the scene. this is from the disney animated feature BAMBI in 1940. later that step was part of the WORKBOOK, the translation of the storyboard into ‘film-language’, where every single scene is prepared in staging, size and camera movements, as well as rough indication of light/shadow and a floorplan, to go from there into layout and later into the background department. during BAMBI that process was more simplified, because every major sequence had an own art director, who was the one defining these staging sketches, as well as the color script for that sequence. they supervised every single step during production, in a way they were ‘directing’ the visuals behind the animation. you can see little differences in handling the staging in this film. for example the climax of the film, the shooting of bambi and the fire was art-directed by john hubley, a master in cinematography. you get an idea when you look at his personal work later in new york.

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here you can compare the initial rough planning of that scene and the final result…

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bambi sc.40 DD0069

look at the little blue thumbnail on top, it is the rough for the next shot, the reverse camera angle…

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bambi 0069 rev.39

© disney enterprises, inc





layout

12 02 2016

historic

the layout in traditional animation is the ‘blueprint’ of a scene, the line and tonal version of a background including camera instructions and field sizes, as well as rough sketched key poses of the animation. in the past the dark and light values were drawn with blue or black soft pencils, in the forties ( BAMBI ) the layout was ‘painted’ with graphite dust and gasoline, highlights erased with eraser-pens. all that was done on vellum what made it easier to trace the lines onto background cardboard. a lot of those layouts from the old days are masterpieces, they look like painted in graphite. in the archives they were not treated as well as most backgrounds, folded several times, a lot of them torn because of the vellum thin quality. following I want to show you a few layouts from some of the older disney animated shorts and feature films. they are treasures of a lost art…

1937 clock cleaners
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1961 101 dalmatians
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1939 the practical pig
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1942 bambi
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1939 donald’s lucky day
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1940 fantasia
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1948 melody time – once upon a wintertime
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1938 mickey’s trailer
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1940 pinocchio
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1938 the moth and the flame
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1959 sleeping beauty
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1947 fun and fancy free – bongo
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1940 fantasia
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1967 the jungle book
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1955 lady and the tramp
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2002 lilo and stitch
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1999 tarzan
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© disney enterprises, inc





a lot more edelmann

2 03 2012

from the eighties some more illustrations created by one of my favorites, an amazing illustrator, designer, typography and layout artist as well as animation production designer – HEINZ EDELMANN.












© heinz edelmann / WDR / manager magazin





comparison 7

1 01 2012

here we go – another year. hopefully a good one, – I doubt it – too many dark clouds on the horizon! anyway, I want to start the BLOG-year with some beautiful artwork, already over fifty years old but for me better than most of the film-design artwork I see today. the disney animated feature film 101 DALMATIANS was released january 25, 1961, the first of the disney films that had a very different style. the animation was xeroxed and showed for the first time most of the original drawings of the animators. the corresponding backgrounds matched the loose lines of the animation perfect, the background details in line were xeroxed as well and the cels placed over the slightly offset gouache colored backgrounds. stylistically a masterpiece. following are a few layout drawings with the recreated backgrounds.








© disney enterprises, inc





through the clouds

29 07 2011

since I saw disney’s PETER PAN for the first time I was fascinated by one extremely long scene – the flight over london and through the clouds. I was convinced that it was a very complicated multiplane arrangement. the combination of character-animation and camera-moves was never explained in any publication about the film. the whole scene is very well planned with the characters moving from far away to extreme close-ups, they turn around their axes and – to make it even more confusing, the camera moves tilted in and out of the background, towards the end apparently with several cloud-layers, below and on top of the characters. stunning!

well, I found an early layout sketch that showed me the basic planning. then I did what I have done so far with over 600 backgrounds, – patch the single screencaptured puzzle pieces of the whole scene together. in this case I have to admit, it was the most complicated ‘reconstruction’ I ever did. the characters were all over the place, covering a lot of detail in the BG, the camera was constantly moving in and out and tilting… it took a while! but it was worth it – now I can see the genius-work in the planning, what an incredible idea!

and – it is not multiplane. patching it all together I noticed that. and – when you look at the scene you understand why multiplane was no option anyway, with all the moving shadows of the flying characters on top of the clouds and all that on focus. impossible in a multi-layered scene. the simple solution – the clouds were airbrushed on different cels and then moved in different speeds. only in the last seconds of the scene, where the camera moves in close to the star, one cloud-level is multiplane. the difference in that case was, the camera was trucking in and a 3-D effect was only possible with an extra cloud-layer.

you can see below the final re-created BG as well as the whole piece with added camera-fields to indicate the camera moves + corresponding screencaptures. and – the whole extremely long BG in 4 pieces in higher resolution.






© disney enterprises, inc

NOTE on july 31, 2011 –
please be so kind and read the comments about this post below. I have to correct myself – it is a multiplane-scene. the precise movement of every single level in the multiplane camera had to be planned in advance anyway. the shadows were just connected to each of the cloudlevels where they had to appear. the animation was done according to the layout of each cloudlevel and was laid as a cel-overlay on top of each them. a little bit complicated in the planning stage, but the same department had managed more complicated assignments, like the truck through about 12 levels with animation in pinocchio ( the daybreak sequence ). sorry for all the confusion, for me the scene is a masterpiece anyway and I guess that the recreation and discussion about this lost jewel helps to understand the inventive filmmaking of the past.





masterdrawings 1

18 07 2011

three stylistically very different disney animated feature films and three layout-drawings created by masters. THE BLACK CAULDRON is not necessarily one of my favorite films, but it had some interesting preproduction artwork and some amazing layouts, like the first one below from around 1983, drawn by MIKE HODGSON. the next pan, drawn by the head of layout himself – DON GRIFFITH -, is from 101 DALMATIANS, around 1960. I wrote before about the RONALD SEARLE influenced style that KEN ANDERSEN had developed. and the last stunning pencil-‘painting’ was created by TOM CODRICK for BAMBI, around 1941/42. it is the 2.level of a multiplane set-up with another foreground and a BG-level below.



© disney enterprises, inc