style 9.5

28 07 2016

style-header2

artists have always been inspired by other artists. otherwise impressionism or cubism had never developed and been explored by so many different artists. in animation disney first used children book illustrators like tenggren and nielsen as inspiration for the style of the first feature films. UPA was smaller and could afford to experiment with new looks, using modern art like dufy and modigliany, but as well upcoming cartoon and caricature stars like steinberg, searle and kurtzman for inspiration. later john hubley went even further with his shorts and a complete abstract look influenced by picasso, shahn and prestopino. I could continue this until today, where modern filmmakers get excited by art they accidentally find on the internet. it is so much easier today to look for reference or inspiration, everybody has a vast collection of art from museums, books, auctions or collectors at home available on the world wide web.
I was always interested to find out how looks were developed in the past. it was like a guideline for my own work, to find ways for developing new styles. now I am trying to teach those secrets to new generations. difficult, because you have to first learn about all the existing art in the world, figurative and landscape or environmental art, get enough knowledge about films of the past – and, experience by analysis how the look of the most interesting films was developed. the real challenge starts when you try to develop your own style for a project. one piece is already tough, but then the problem is to create a whole series of environments in the same style.

human faces+art

faces in art 1





picasso’s ceramics

9 07 2014

picasso ceramics

PABLO PICASSO, 1881 – 1973, fell in love with a new creative medium in 1946. he was already 65 years old and was considered as one of the most influental artists of the 20th century, known for co-founding the CUBIST movement together with GEORGES BRAQUE, and responsible for significant more developments in painting, sculpture and printmaking. PICASSO’S new love affair was CERAMICS, and lasted until his death. together with the MADOURA studio he created 4.000 different plates, bowls, vases, pitchers and other forms in limited editions ranging from 25 to 500. PICASSO was involved in different ways, sometimes creating the clay molds, other times painting on plates or pitchers taken from the drying racks. the prototypes were then finished by the MADOURA artisans.
in GEORGES RAMIE’S book PICASSO’S CERAMICS the author states – PICASSO gave himself up to it heart and soul, with that tireless vehemence he brought to everything, the indomitable ardor of those vocations that are all the more fruitful for being slow to appear. and it was from that moment – and thanks to the prestige of the work PICASSO was yet to do – that ceramics, which many had always considered a minor art, began to enjoy an eminence hitherto unsuspected and now universally admitted.
PICASSO had already been amazingly productive as a printmaker, he too enjoyed creating ceramics, producing more than 2.000 pieces just in one year from 1947 to 1948, embodying innovations in form, technique, and the use of colors. below you can see a small selection of my favorite pieces of his ceramics art.

13picasso6818
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8picasso 6430
7picasso6423
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5picasso 6452
4picasso 6451
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KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

© pablo picasso / sotheby’s





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